Deep Learning to classify big data

By Sahar Tavakoli

Our brains do an expert job of classification; it happens when we recognize people from their faces, categorize an object that we see, or predict the future state of an event. Proportional to  the complexity of an input pattern, the classification can be easy (for example recognizing the difference between a cat and a dog) or difficult, such as predicting the probability of two people becoming friends in a social network.

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The human brain’s deep architecture has been an inspiration for deep nets.

The human brain’s deep architecture, as an example of a successful agent in classification tasks, has inspired the development of deep nets, artificial neural networks that can learn tasks that contain more than one hidden layer between the input and output layers. This work has shown amazing result recently.

In deep neural networks, each layer consists of several nodes, called neurons. Edges in a neural network are between two consequent layers. Each edge has a weight and each node has a bias value. These neutral networks “learn” by applying training inputs to the input layer of the network and comparing them to the desired (and known) output. The input is weighted and modified until the desired outcome is achieved.

Neural networks have been around since 1970, but back then, they were successful only in simple pattern problems. Tackling more complicated patterns meant adding layers to the system and training with a large number of layers. This is what is now called a deep net, and it was not possible until recently, when computer scientists found better ways to train a deep net such as applying new types of activation functions to nodes.

Deep learning has shown amazing results—sometimes better than those of the human brain—in areas such as image processing, speech processing, social media analysis and biology. Since training a deep net is not possible with restricted amounts of data, having enough data is a prerequisite in using deep learning techniques. Social media, which creates massive amounts of data every day, is a good source of big data and therefore can help in further developing deep learning and neural networks.

During the 2017 International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, & Prediction and Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation (SBP-BRiMS 2017),  I observed that several research groups are using this emerging method in the social computation field. These researches have different interests in using deep learning techniques, including the ability to predict links in social media, text analysis, predicting peoples’ feeling from pictures they share on social media, terrorism source prediction, news propagation modeling, and predicting peoples’ locations based on the information they share.

The conference made it clear that deep learning is a new and promising method in social computing research, but we must remember that working with big data and training a deep net requires the proper hardware, such as the most appropriate GPUs. These factors still restrict the use of deep learning, but the future is promising for this growing field.

20161015_205156Sahar Tavakoli is a PhD student in computer science at the University of Central Florida. She attended the 2017 International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, & Prediction and Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation (SBP-BRiMS) with support from the South Big Data Hub. The conference was held July 5 – 8 at George Washington University in Washington, DC.

Visuals, storytelling help make sense of data

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Panelists discuss data visualization at a recent workshop sponsored by the South and West Big Data Hubs.

By Mark Schroeder

Throughout human history, stories have helped us make sense of sequences of events in our lives, infer cause and effect relationships, and share them with others. Just as our own memories are fallible and retelling stories can shape how we remember events, data can be fallible too. Its value is shaped by the process used to collect it and can be incomplete, incorrect, or biased in some fashion. How can we use data to gain true insights about the world and share them despite these challenges?

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Mobile Health Workshop sparks ideas for future research

by Wenbin Zhang

Wenbin ZhangAs a first-year PhD student in information systems, I have been working on mobile health (mHealth) related research since the start of my PhD program. The growth of mHealth has facilitated better and instantaneous health communication, which was not previously possible. The capabilities of mHealth platforms promise to enhance healthcare quality and assist people in achieving healthy lifestyles at reduced costs. Attending the mHealth workshop organized by the South Big Data Hub and the National Consortium for Data Science (NCDS), located at the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) deepened my understanding of mHealth, simply by having the chance to listen to and participate in intense discussions with an interdisciplinary group of mHealth and technology experts. Continue reading

Developing Standards for Mobile Health

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Attendees at the mHealth conference discuss key issues, including mHealth standards, at a breakout session.

By Alex Cheng

I was honored to have the opportunity to attend the Mobile Health (mHealth) conference sponsored by the South Big Data Innovation Hub and the National Consortium for Data Science as a third-year graduate student in biomedical informatics at Vanderbilt University. My research focuses on using mHealth technology to improve the efficiency of outpatient clinic operations and the quality of care for patients.  Continue reading

Can wearable devices lead to better health outcomes?

Reflections on the South BD Hub mHealth Workshop

By Chenzhang Bao

mhealth-phone-e1498589419307.jpgIn recent years, mobile health (mHealth) has become one of the most popular health care movements for patients and providers. Consumers have embraced the use of mHealth applications in their daily lives through wearable devices, and use these apps to monitor their exercise routines, heartbeats, and sleep quality. The use of mHealth apps is critical for research into new mechanisms designed to improve the quality of patient engagement; a factor that has previously been hard to measure or even unobservable to providers. One important research question looks at the relationship between patients’ usage of mHealth devices, their engagement in their own health and the future health outcomes. Continue reading

Microsoft Research looks back at a year of successful collaboration with the Big Data Hubs

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Vani Mandava of Microsoft Research (far right), with leaders of the Big Data Hubs, from left to right: Fen Zhao, NSF program coordinator; Lea Shanley, South Hub; Melissa Cragin, Midwest Hub; Rene Baston, Northeast Hub; Meredith Lee, West Hub; and Renata Rawlings-Goss, South Hub.

Microsoft Research understands that taking full advantage of big data and new data technologies requires more than developing new tools and technologies. To paraphrase Vani Mandava, director of data science for the research arm of the tech giant, it requires cross-disciplinary research that extends well beyond computer science, and collaboration among domain science experts, computing and data science specialists, and industry leaders in technology and other verticals.

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Shifting the paradigm of care via mHealth

mHealth-3By Ashley C. Griffin

The South Big Data Innovation Hub and the National Consortium for Data Science (NCDS), in collaboration with the Institute for the Future and 10X Collective, held a workshop that brought together a diverse body of experts to identify and prioritize research challenges in data science and IoT cyberinfrastructure.

The workshop participants thoughtfully assessed a wide array of mobile health (mhealth) applications to address health disparities and their environmental influences within the research, legal, policy, environment, and clinical settings. Within the clinical setting, participants identified shifting the point of care to the patient using mHealth technologies as a key priority.  Continue reading

Leveraging the OGC Innovation Program to Advance Big Data Spokes

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By Luis Bermudez, Executive Director, Open Geospatial Consortium Innovation Program

The National Science Foundation (NSF) currently has an open program solicitation that seeks to establish more ‘Big Data Spokes’ to advance big data applications. Like the BD Hubs, the BD Spokes provide a regional coordinating role but focus on narrower topic areas, such as applications that address the acquisition and use of health data, or data science in agriculture. In addition to its topic area, Spokes are driven by three themes: 1) advancing solutions towards a grand challenge; 2) automating the big data lifecycle; and 3) improving and incentivizing access to critical data.  Continue reading

New Report Looks at Strategies for Building a Data Economy

screen-shot-2017-02-24-at-5-27-39-pmTwo groups with a keen interest in data science –the North Carolina Board of Science, Technology & Innovation and the National Consortium for Data Science—have teamed up to produce a report that examines what the Tar Heel state needs to do to be a leader in the emerging data economy.

The report, NC in the Next Tech Tsumani: Navigating the Data Economy, says North Carolina has the raw assets to build a world-class data economy, including top-tier universities and thriving business sectors in technology, life sciences and finance.  However, those assets must be nurtured through a focus on data science education, data literacy, support for data-focused startups, and a coordinated effort to present the state as a data leader.   Continue reading

Hackathon in Rocket City (Huntsville, AL) focuses on flood management

screen-shot-2017-02-17-at-10-57-54-amWe can’t control Mother Nature, but we can use data to mitigate some of her more destructive occurrences, including floods.

That’s the premise behind a hackathon sponsored by the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA) and the city of Huntsville, AL. The hackathon, to be held Feb. 25 and 26, will give software developers, policymakers, public safety officials, business leaders, and other creative problem solvers the chance to make a difference in how communities prepare for and respond to dangerous floods.   Continue reading