New Report Looks at Strategies for Building a Data Economy

screen-shot-2017-02-24-at-5-27-39-pmTwo groups with a keen interest in data science –the North Carolina Board of Science, Technology & Innovation and the National Consortium for Data Science—have teamed up to produce a report that examines what the Tar Heel state needs to do to be a leader in the emerging data economy.

The report, NC in the Next Tech Tsumani: Navigating the Data Economy, says North Carolina has the raw assets to build a world-class data economy, including top-tier universities and thriving business sectors in technology, life sciences and finance.  However, those assets must be nurtured through a focus on data science education, data literacy, support for data-focused startups, and a coordinated effort to present the state as a data leader.   Continue reading

Hackathon in Rocket City (Huntsville, AL) focuses on flood management

screen-shot-2017-02-17-at-10-57-54-amWe can’t control Mother Nature, but we can use data to mitigate some of her more destructive occurrences, including floods.

That’s the premise behind a hackathon sponsored by the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA) and the city of Huntsville, AL. The hackathon, to be held Feb. 25 and 26, will give software developers, policymakers, public safety officials, business leaders, and other creative problem solvers the chance to make a difference in how communities prepare for and respond to dangerous floods.   Continue reading

South Hub Sponsors Data Science for Social Good Summer Program 2017

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By Arjun Sawhney, South Big Data Hub
SawhneyArjun@gmail.com

South Big Data Hub is partnering with Data Science for Social Good- Atlanta to bring nine graduate students from various southern states to participate in a ten-week paid internship experience. The program would place undergraduate and graduate students in multidisciplinary teams to work under the supervision of a Georgia Tech faculty mentor on a problem that comes from a local government or nonprofit partner in the Atlanta metro area. Mentors from the local data science practitioner community will provide additional guidance and support. Continue reading

Join the conversation on building data science capacity

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Participants in the Federal Data in Action Summit express their views on key data questions by moving around the room, with those on each side representing opposite ends of a spectrum and those in the middle representing the middle ground.

December Summit launched conversation—now we want your thoughts

By Tim J. Gabel, @timgabel
Executive Vice President, RTI International

I had the pleasure of attending the December 15, 2016 Federal Data in Action Summit in Washington DC. The meeting was co-hosted by a team that included the National Science Foundation, the four Big Data Regional Innovation Hubs, and the Department of Homeland Security. It was a chance to spend an afternoon with an extraordinary collection of thought leaders, practitioners, and government agency representatives. The focus of the day – to “share lessons learned and best practices for building data science capacity” – is of great relevance to organizations and the U.S. economy. Continue reading

Chinese scientists get a taste of data-driven research at U.S. State Department-sponsored visit

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Chinese and American scientists take a break for a group photo during an afternoon of discussion on data analytics in environmental sciences.

Science, and the process of sharing scientific knowledge and ideas to solve problems, knows no national or political boundaries. That’s why when a group of Chinese scientists visited RENCI as guests of the South Big Data Hub, the discussion was lively, timely, and productive. Continue reading

Panel examines the role of data in public and environmental health

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Panelists and audience members participate in the South Big Data Hub roundtable on data analytics in environmental health both remotely and in person.

The South Big Data Hub Roundtable held on January 11 in Chapel Hill, NC, provided an open discussion forum with a focus on Translational Data Analytics for Environmental Health.

Ashok Krishnamurthy, PhD, moderated the discussion, which included panelists Andy May, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of civil, environmental, and geodetic engineering at The Ohio State University, Ayaz Hyder, PhD, assistant professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences at Ohio State’s College of Public Health, David Peden, PhD,  a distinguished professor at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and Paul Kizakevich, PhD, a senior research engineer in the bioinformatics program at RTI International. Continue reading

A state of the union panel discussion on Apache Spark/Big Data innovation

img_0647On January 19, MetiStream hosted our meetup: The Washington DC Apache Spark Interactive and held a State of the Union Panel Discussion on Apache Spark Big Data Innovation. A fitting topic given the transition of power in Washington that happened the next day. We firmly believe that a consistent focus on big data powers innovation and keeps America strong and distinctive.Our technology meetups shepard this innovation by bringing the community together to learn and share knowledge, network, and find opportunities for our members. Yes, we may be a roomful of geeks…but this is what we do. This is fun for us! Continue reading

Highlighting Big Data at HBCUs

The C.R.E.D.I.T. Center: Big Military Data at HBCU’s

Author: Taylor Mitchell

logocreditThe Center of excellence in Research and Education for big military Data InTelligence otherwise known as the C.R.E.D.I.T Center is Prairie View A&M University’s premiere graduate level program for the processing and effective sorting of complex data. Funded by the Department of Defense, the C.R.E.D.I.T Center is one of three centers funded by the DoD at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. It is a one-stop-shop for engaging students in Big Data education, analytics and solving complex real-time problems for the military.

Continue reading

NIH BD2K offers lecture series on fundamentals of data science

As big data becomes ubiquitous in research and business, more and more people are finding they need guidance on how to make the most of their data and follow best practices. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative recognizes that for biomedical researchers and clinicians to take full advantage of the data revolution they need…well, data—in the form of training, guidelines, expert advise, use cases, and more.

To meet this need, the BD2K now offers a virtual lecture series on the data science underlying biomedical research, featuring weekly presentations from experts on the fundamentals of data management, representation, computation, statistical inference, data modeling, and other topics relevant to big data in biomedicine. The BD2K Guide to the Fundamentals of Data Science Series offers live streaming presentations every Friday from noon to 1 p.m. Eastern time. The presentations are also recorded and posted online for future viewing and reference.

Two sessions are already online: Introduction to Big Data and the Data Lifecycle, and Data Indexing and Retrieval. They can be viewed on YouTube here. The next live presentation, called Finding and Accessing Data Sets, Indexing and Identifiers, will be held Sept. 23 and will feature Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD, and chair of the department of biomedical informatics at the University of California at San Diego.

There is no cost for attending or viewing a presentation and no registration is required. For more information about the series, including a list of upcoming lectures, visit the BD2K Training Coordinating Center website.

 

 

DataBridge tackles the problem of ‘dark data’

databridge-logo-final-copyDataBridge, a National Science Foundation-funded project to make research data more discoverable and usable by a wide community of scientists, has the green light to expand its work into the neuroscience community, thanks to a new NSF EAGER award.

The award itself is relatively small (less than $100,000) and will allow the researchers to consult with neuroscientists, develop a prototype DataBridge for Neuroscience (DBfN), and a community workshop. However, the impact could be significant for a hot scientific field that is making breakthrough discoveries about the human brain. Continue reading